MOO cards and monochromes

I love turquoise. It’s such a vibrant, living color. So when I made my MOO cards, I decided I wanted to make them in a simple monochrome turquoise color scheme.

The front of the card is actually a barcode that, when scanned, shows my name. It was created with the use of an online barcode generator which was quite fun to play with. It’s been made with the symbology “Code 39” that can handle non-numeric data. [Correction: The front of the card is a colorised version of a barcode, that when scanned, shows my name. The actual card unfortunately doesn’t scan correctly because of the colorisation.]

And as you might have noticed, my blog now also has turned turquoise. The font has been changed to Helvetica and Helvetica Neue – my absolute favorite fonts along with Gill Sans and Myriad Pro.

So, I hope you like it – I know I do :)

13 thoughts on “MOO cards and monochromes”

  1. Nice new design, and cool looking cards.
    I follow you along on your favorite fonts … almost.
    As a graphic designer I really HATE GILL … not so much for the look/design of the font. More due the amount of work required to create beautiful text. Especially numbers set with Gill is a “mother” to work with. The amount of kerning needed is heavy :)

    Love your site by the way … lot’s of cool/interesting reads!

  2. Ooooo! I like it Trine! Clean and bold. Nice. Oh and I LOVE Moo cards too so all good there!

    Your “bar code” design looks great on a Moo card.

  3. Love the moo card (and the new site design), Trine. :) Especially how the turquoise monochrome removes the initial association with a barcode (lovely little delighter).

  4. Hi Niels, thanks for the nice comments :) I agree on Gill being a “mother” to work with in certain areas. When I use Gill, I actually use Helvetica Neue for numbers – the two font work surprisingly well together.

  5. Hi Aral, thanks for your comments – I’m delighted with the look & feel too :) I was aiming for a concept of “barcode meets beach chair”, but wanted something that had a hidden, contextual layer as well.

  6. Hi Katie,
    Thanks a lot :) Practically any barcode reader will be able to scan your barcode, for instance ZBar which is a free iPhone app. Of course, depending on the symbology you’ve used to create your barcode.

  7. Finally catching up and reading your blog – and it’s a thing of beauty! Looking forward to getting my grubby little hands on one of these MOO cards.

    When I saw the cards image on twitter I didn’t realise that the pattern was a bar code – very nice and clever touch!

    See you soon :-)

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